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Al Jazeera America
Aug 26, 2013 7:00pm EDT
crime-ridden areas. >>> and those are the headlines this hour. "real money with ali velshi" is up next. you can keep up to date on all of our stories at aljazeera.com. ♪ >> i'll tell you what sales of appliances last month tell us about the durability of the economic recovery. plus a look at how water is becoming a hot commodity for farmers struggling to survive in the west. i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." ♪ >>> this is "real money." you are the most important part of this show, so join our live conversation for the next half hour, by using the hashtag, ajreel -- ajrealmoney. we'll look at windows into our economy, and one of those windows shows us how confident consumers feel about the economy, by being willing to guy things like this electric shaver. this report can be just as useful as measures like home sales, unemployment, and consumer sentiment in judging the state of our economy. now for the news -- [ technical difficulties ] now during goods can be anything from this small electric shaver, to a jumbo jet or a ship. they include big ticket items, basically manu
Al Jazeera America
Aug 27, 2013 7:00pm EDT
ali velshi" is next on al jazeera. ♪ >>> well it seems you still hot on the u.s. economy and with good reason. home prices up again. stocks are down, but oil prices are up. the nest egg you are building with your 401k may have a fixable crack in it. all of that is coming up. i'm ali velshi, and this is "real money." ♪ >>> this is "real money." you are the most important part of the show, so join our conversation for the next half hour by using the hashtag ajrealmoney. perception of the economy is economic reality in the u.s. how you feel governs how you spend. and the brand new consumer confidence survey shows you are feeling good. the same survey a month ago showed your confidence waned compared to june. when you dig into the survey, you see your confidence in current economic conditions is lower than it was in july, but you are more confident about the next six months than you were a month ago. and even though you may be putting off big purchases, your are confident enough to take a vacation in the next six months. so what gives? a great deal of confidence stems from your home. hom
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 8:30am EDT
there's a news channel with more of what americans want to know. >>i'm ali velshi, and this is real money. >>this is america tonight. >>our news coverage, reporting, and documentaries explore, inspire, and reveal more of america's stories. >>i'm here to investigate genetically modified salmon. jazeera america. >> i'm kim bondy, growing up in news was always important. you have this great product that you are ready to share with the country. i'm a part of a team that is moving in the same direction. antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. >>a. >> >> >>> we were just talking about consumer confidence, a big one-day drop in the stock market may not erode your confidence in this economy, but a big oil spike will. stocks tumbled on tuesday with the dow closing down more than 170 points for the day. but that is just a little more than a percent. investors seem concerned about the possibility of an attack on syria, and they are also worried about oil. oil prices went up more than $3 a barrel on
Al Jazeera America
Aug 27, 2013 2:30am EDT
are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? it drives discussion across america. share your story on tv and online. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. ♪ >>> a new development monday at america's once mighty retailer jcpenney. bill akman is dumping his shares in the company, 39 million of them. last week i told you how he
Al Jazeera America
Aug 27, 2013 8:30am EDT
. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? it drives discussion across america. share your story on tv and online. and you can kiss that puppy goodbye, chula vista would answer back. they would come up clutch. jianca rlo, and california is back on top, 4-3. but buckle up, this game was a rollercoaster ride. the bottom of the fifth, they ♪ >>> a new development monday at america's once mighty retailer jcpenney. bill akman is dumping his shares in the company, 39 million of them. last week i told you how he used his influence to bring in ron johnson to remake jcpenney. now it's stock is down more than 30% this year alone. ron johnson is long gone, and akman has pie in his face, so he is selling his shares. so the saga of one of america's great retail icons continues. let's talk about water. the battle over water is forcing some communities to make tough choices with real financial effects, and there's no indust
Al Jazeera America
Aug 21, 2013 2:30am EDT
. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. al jazeera america - a new voice in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. with an autographed jersey, and obama shared a few praise. >> coach shula retired with more wins than any coach in history. each time that record has been challenged, team after team has fallin short. >> michael eaves joins us to talk more about that. the president was having a lot [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart c
Al Jazeera America
Aug 22, 2013 6:00pm EDT
with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. ♪ >>> welcome back everyone, as president obama tries to ratchet up support for his economic policies he is targeting a key constituency focused on the soaring cost of higher education. david shuster has the report. [ cheers ] >> at the university of buffalo, the president announced ambitious changes to make colleges more affordable and accountable for their costs. >> college has never been more expensive. over the past three decades, the average tuition at a public, four-year college has gone up by more than 250%. >> reporter: and so the president said he will use executive orders and lobby for new legislation that would make changes in three years. >> what we want to do is rate them on who is offering the best value so students and taxpayers get a bigger bang for their buck. >> reporter: the american council on education reacted cautiously, describing the president's effort as a sweeping thou
Al Jazeera America
Aug 29, 2013 2:30am EDT
www.aljazeera.com. ali velshi is next with "real money." thanks so much for watching. launched a new and needed voice in journalism. the new york times calls it "serious, straight-forward news". "accurate, responsible" says the washington post. and the baltimore sun says, "instantly engaging and powerful". al jazeera america, there's more to it. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. >> al-jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. >> introduces "america tonight". gas. >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. states. >> grounded.
Al Jazeera America
Aug 25, 2013 8:00am EDT
. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> i have a dream. my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. [applause] >> his words forever penned in american history. it has been 5 50 years since dr. mayor tin luther king, junior delivered his iconic i have a dream speech. this weekend tens of thousandsdiothousandsdescended o continue his vision and many warn that the advances are now in danger of being rolled back. [applause] >> the crowds in front of the lynne kl memorial did not match the 200,000 or more that watched martin luther king at the same spot a half century ago but the determination to see america redeem his vision was strong as children veronica and benisha were at the 25th anniversary of the march and brought their own kids to the 50-year commemoration. >> there are a lot of people that still care about equity and i couldn' justice in the und st
Al Jazeera America
Aug 23, 2013 6:00pm EDT
analysis. here is ali velshi. good toomes sold in july. that's what the number was. back before the recession there was a lot more building, so new homes from 15% of the market. but still puny by comparison. why do we care? because when you buy an existing home maybe you buy some furniture. maybe you bu bring your old furniture. you get some people involved. you pay a realtor, lawyer, appraiser who makes one, this pt of data is really, really important. >> what is behind this? is it just the spike in mortgage rates? >> hard have talked about this for years. i don't like to make a trend out of a month, but something i one. >> more on this at 7:00? >> yes, i'm g going to talk abot the housing industry in general. >> can't wait, "real money with ali velshi." good to see you man. >>> the plunge in new homes sales comes at a time when many americans feel nervous about the economy, but there could be more trouble ahead. >> reporter: laying the federal reserve for the economic jitters for all that we're feeling right now. it's chairman ben bernanke let slip he's thinking about cutting back
Al Jazeera America
Aug 24, 2013 5:30am EDT
ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. they told me i got a little bit of health issue with i think they called it something to do with my pancreas. >> reporter: from cancer to birth defects uranium exposure took a devastating toll on the navajo nations and effects are being uncovered and this is something you and your family and friends lived with for decades. kind of describe the things you have seen happen and that are now seeming almost more than there. >> one of the first aspects of this is it's no respect of person and therefore the ailments and sicknesses that come forth will attach to young, the old, non-navajo and navajo and that is just to sum it all up, that we are all going to be impacted in one fashion or another. and impacted in a fashion, it may be -- in the future generations because look at breast milk and mothers are feeding their children basically what will happen is what is filtering down in that particular gene. >>> these are pictures who lost six of their children in
Al Jazeera America
Aug 21, 2013 1:00am EDT
americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >>they share it on the stream. >>social media isn't an afterthought. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet for those conversations. >>post, upload, and interact. >>every night, share undiscovered stor
Al Jazeera America
Aug 30, 2013 7:00pm EDT
the headlines at this hour. real money is coming up next request ali velshi. the news in an hour here on al jazeera. >> the u.s. is producing so much oil that one day in the near future it may have no need for opec oil but at what costs will gin independence come? >> stocks have their first in more than a year. apple wants you trade in your old iphone far the new one. i'll tell you whether you should. i'm ali velchi and this is real money. >> the trading on friday is r settling in at $107.65 a barrel. that's in response to a resent chemical attack that killedvilleians outside the damascus. president obama told reporters friday he's actively consulting congress and others act the prospect of military intervention in syria. i have not made a final decision about various actions that might be taking to help enforce that. as i've already said, i have had my military and our team look at a wide range of options. >>> while american officials figure out whether or not to bomb syria, oil markets are freaked out that an attack could spark a wider conflict that disrupts oil supplies in the mide
Al Jazeera America
Aug 26, 2013 5:30am EDT
. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> it is no secret that the soaring cost of a college education is a financial burden for america's middle class. president barack obama proposed creating a new system to rate colleges on how much value they offer students based on graduation rates, loan debt and tuition. he wants congress to tie federal aid to colleges on how well they score. this is all designed to make college more affordable. whether the president's plan goes anywhere in washington is far from certain but there is no doubt that outrage over tuition is focussing more attention on the pay and perks awarded to university presidents. some critics say that the tuition may fall if university presidents were not paid so much. but as reported, the pay of college pst have to do with raise. >> kayla smith waits tables at night after working in a downtown columbus office for a non-profit group. >> if you need anyth
Al Jazeera America
Aug 25, 2013 8:30am EDT
city. i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." >> welcome to "real money" you're the most important part of this show. tweet us or use the hashtag on facebook or twitter. get ready, obamacare is coming. the changes in here are big. this will reshape health insurance markets, it will change the way we access and pay doctors, hospitals and drug companies. make no mistake, it will effect you no matter who you are. this law is more than 900 pages long and boy it is complicated. opposition has been fierce. if you're not insured you will have to buy coverage or pay a fine. if you, like most americans, who get their coverage through work are insured, it still effects you. now, this show will be your source of information about obamacare. i'm going to help you navigate in beast as it rolls out so that you can get the most for your money. now, there is a lot in here. let's start with something basic, a doctor's visit. this law is supposed to give more people access to medical care but what if there are not enough doctors in your area? by 2020 it is estimated that there will be a short m of 4
Al Jazeera America
Aug 23, 2013 2:00am EDT
points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> president obama has unveiled a new plan to help cut the cost of college. he wants to use a rating system that judges schools on their affordable. colleges are kept tall abou skee plan and are worried it will cost their institutions millions of dollars. >> obama: i believe we should rate colleges, are they helping students to succeed? [applause] and on outcomes on their value to students and parents, so that means metrics like how much debt does the average student leave with? how easy is it to pay off? how many students graduate on time? how well do those graduates do in the workforce? because the answers will help parents and students figure out how much value a college truly offers. >> it's not only the cost of college opportunities have to worry about. there are fees for tuition, books, room and board as well. as diane easter brook reports those costs are forci
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 7:00pm EDT
jazeera.com. >> for nearly two weeks fire crews have been battling the fire around yosemite national park. crews are using a drone to fly over the massive blaze to look for flames breaking out. the family of a florida teenager is suing the miami beach and the city hsaying that the police usd excessive force when they tased the teenager and for refusing to giving the teen proper medical care. >> tensions in syria drive u.s. oil prices to a two-year high sending prices higher and threatening to derail the economic recovery. i talked to someone who said that might an good thing. and looking at a city going through drastic measures to pay its bills. and we look at the march for equality. i'm ali velshi, and this is "real money." [♪ music ] >> this is real money. you're the most important part of the show. join our conversation by ewing the #aj. u.s. oil features to which your gas prices are closely tied settled at $110.10 a barely in trading wednesday. that price has jumped for more than $4 a barrel so far. >> soil up on fears of a conflict, not because of supply and demand. america produces 10 million barrels of oil a day. we consume double that, but globally the world produces and uses 89 million barrels of oil a day, and 30% of that comes from the middle east. so it's oil traders, speculators who are to blame for driving up the price of oil. this week right now there is absolutely no supply problem on oil. today on twitter and facebook i've been asking you how would a spike in gas prices change your spending habits? on facebook canner ara writes, there would absolutely be less money for groceries and going out. the discretionary spending that supports my economy takes the first hit. this viewer said i would have to find a new job. i already have taken a pay cut and i'm low on cash now. the commute would exacerbate the costs. tweet us or leave us a question on facebook. maybe these increasing oil prices b which by the way has st this country in a recession in previous decades, might not be a bad thing. >>> detroit's bankruptcy has sent off a huge legal battle over pensions that it owes its workers. many other american cities have so-called underfunded pensions. some are leaning on taxpayers to make up the difference. i'll show you how charleston, west virginia, is raising revenues and cutting costs so it can pay its pensions. >> reporter: the city is about to impose .005 cents sales tax and is charging everyone a $2 a week fee. >> we've got that story and much more as real money continues. keep it right here. antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. >> bankruptcy hearings resumed in detroit and has folks i with underfunded pensions worried. that's forcing some local governments to turn to taxpayers who were not supposed to be on the hook for pensions to shell out more money. reporting on one west virginia city taking extraordinary steps to stay out of bankruptcy and to keep those pensioners paid. >> reporter: charleston, west virginia, first responders dealing today with a barricaded gunman. after 20 years on the job they have access to healthcare and are guaranteed generous pensions. >> oh, it's sweet. you could retire with $50,000 a year for life. >> reporter: but the residents are dealing with the payout that could easily exceed $1 million for each retiree. there the is so little fun that they're dipping in their general fund to keep the pensioners paid, and that general fund used to pay for street keening and salaries. >> we were paying 8% of our budgets into these retirement pensions. now we're paying 11.3% and it will go out. >> reporter: the mayor stopped payout to the pension fund, in 2009 charleston had one of the country's worst funded pensions. it only had $0.24 for every dollar it promised to pay retirees. in all, the 100 largest cities in america were underfunded by $9 billion. and standar standard and standa. >> pensions were close to 100% funded and there are genius benefits given during the budgetary stress of the great recessions so systems contributed less than they needed to. >> reporter: now taken together the 50 states have just $0.48 for every pension dollar they promised. that money has to be repaid. unlike 401k plans pensions guarantee a minimum monthly payment for life even if the assets and the plan sync to nothing, and in detroit even bankruptcy does not even guarantee paying the pensioners. that's why they're taking care to cut costs. >> reporter: the city is about to impose a $.0 pay tax and charge everyone who works in charleston, a new $2 a week fee. unless they reduce benefits it will be taxpayers who have to foot the bill of underfunded pensions. >> in 2013 every single state has one bill that addresses some sort of pension reform including puerto rico, which could mean more costs for employees and employers or more costs for tax payers. >> reporter: in an odd twist charleston is also considering not accepting federal grants. >> free money is free money. but it's current and no one is looking at the long-term effects of those. >> reporter: the programs look at over time pay for workers but it boosts their pension check for life. >> for every dollar we pay, we'll pay another $5 in pension. there is an impact there. >> reporter: it's an impact that many are facing. >> when i came here 20 years ago i envisioned to actually survive after i get to the age of 50 and put food on my table and pay bills. >> reporter: he has a year left before receiving a pension. he hopes the system will do as much for him as he has done for it. al jazeera, charles son, west virginia. >> the city's pension is underfunded by $274 million. they say the steps they're now taking should have the pension fully funded in 30 years. or sooner. wow. let's go back to the situation in detroit where the man in charge of the city's bankruptcy say its pensions are underfunded by $3.5 billion, and he's proposing deep cuts to the benefits. paid to the detroit's retirees and spouses. retirees are fighting back in court, but as that plays out it's a waiting and worry. connie is 6 64 years old. she was married to a police officer who died nine years ago she was receiving pension from his benefit. connie, thank you so much for being with us. first of all my mother would admire you because you live a frugal live. you haven't worked. you're getting your husband's pension, and you live frugally. but now this is a problem. you could make it on that $25,000 a year which is half as much as more americans could make it on, but now you're worried where that is going to come from. >> right. >> what are your options? what are you thinking about? >> well, i've already talked to my son and my daughter-in-law that if i have to i could always back in and live with them, but i'm 64, i really don't want to live with my son and five kids. if i have to, i have to. >> this is a tough thing. you just heard the story that my friend duarte did about the firefighters in west virginia. your husband, what did he do? tell me about your husband. >> well, he was a police officer for 26.5 years. my father-in-law was a detective in the detroit police department, so they just figured that we were guaranteed our pension the rest of our life, so my husband put his life on the line every day. now he would be appalled to find out that i may not get a pension. >> you--have you managed to put away a little money, or does it take everything you get in that pension to live? >> it's funny, i bought my very first car ever, and now i'm worried about being able to pay for my car. so yes, i'm worried. if i pay for my car, then will i be able to eat. it's a worry. >> you're also worried because you're turning 65. you're going to be under medicare later this year, that's another set of worries. are you going to have your medical benefits? or are you going to be end up paying more for certain things on the medical side that will affect your car or your food? >> yes, exactly. if i pay for medicine, will i be able to eat. >> but for the moment-- >> it's just terrible. sorry. >> if you continues--sorry, we have a little bit of a delay on the line, which is why. connie, if things are okay, if you continue to get your husband's pension, can you continue to carry on as you have happily. this is your home hyped you, and you're fine with that? >> yes, i am. as you can tell. i don't live in a very big house. i run my air conditioner only when i have to, and i try to save money, but prices keep going up. gas keeps going up, and it's just terrible that now i may not be able to do the little things i do now. >> connie, thank you for sharing your story for us. you're pretty brave. i think you're going to make it. but i get the point. when you're depending on $25,000 a year, and that's in jeopardy, you need a little peace from that. that's connie in it florida. she was talking about gas. stephen leib who heads up leib capital in new york. he is believed to be an authority and among the many books he has risk is a best seller called "the coming economy collapse." he still happens to think oil is going to go to high levels. stephen, good to see you. first of all connie, $25,000. that is a lot less than most americans live on, but she didn't seem unhappy. she can make it, but she talked about medical expenses and she talked about gasoline. >> right, ali, we're on the wrong track in this country, and we have to get woken up, and there is a lot of oil in the ground, we can frack for it. but what people don't realize if it takes one barrel of oil to get a barrel, there's no oil. that's it. whatever you have you're using to get oil of the ground go even some of these methodologieses for drilling or extracting oil from the ground they're using a lot of energy. >> not only a lot of energy, but a lot of water. that's really the crux of it. in texas right now, the number i saw in the last day or so is 99% of texas where so much oil comes from is in drought. basically you're fighting for food or energy. that's a terrible trade-off. china gets it. they get it in spades. right now they have an all-out drive to build a smart grid, to build renewable energies. >> your point is as oil price gas up we start talking about renewables and alternatives. >> every recession has been precede by a gain of 80% to 100% oil prices within a 12-month period. if you get that kind of gain, and this is for anybody. if you see oil go up 80% from its low to 150, 160, 170 now, very careful. if you see oil at 180 i would go to an island and let the dust clear. that basically is how reliable this has been. >> you're going to know what kind of power to generate once we live there. steve, thank you so much p stephen leeb, founder and research chairman of the leeb group. by now you'll heard a lot about martin luther king's march on washington, but did you know the full name of the historic event 50 years ago was the march on washington for jobs and freedom. are we better off today than we were back then? some shocking stats for you upon my return. >> thousands of people gathered in washington to celebrate the 50th anniversary of martin luther king's i have a "dream" speech and the march on washington you may not know that the title of the event was the march on washington for jobs and freedom. the fact is dr. king was as focused on economic equality as he was on civil rights. in the last year of his life he launched what is called "the poor people's's "campaign" aimed as helping poor people groups. >> reporter: according to historians reverend martin luther king was very concerned that the economic gap between races could derail his civil rights movement with poverty and income disparities being the ultimate segregator. >> in 1968 he pivoted all of his attention on what was called the poor people's campaign. he was killed before his first march. >> reporter: his poor people's campaign was focused on providing economic rights for blacks, latinos, native americans and whites. dr. king asked the federal government for $30 billion anti-poverty package, including a massive investment in infrastructure, healthcare and higher minimum wage, the same issues that lawmakers debate today. >> it is a sense of having control of your life and having the personal financial dignity and the choices to then create the reality that you want that i think is the issue. and we've never been in that regard in control of our own destiny. >> reporter: 50 years later by some measures final disparity has gotten worse. when the poor people's campaign was launch in 1968 the median black family was making $0.60 for every $1 that the white family made. that has fallen. the average net worth of families in the united states stands at $632,000. that falls to $110,000 for hispanic and $98,000 for blacks while people of color on the losing sides of wealth gaps in this country, the key concern has to be who happens in two decades when the struggling majority is the minority. >> we have a shift of people all around the world younger and darker. unless we empower we folks the world has got a problem. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed. we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal. >> reporter: with an equal chance to enjoy the freedom and peace of mind that come with economic security. stacey tisdale, al jazeera, new york. [♪ music ] >> according to the economic policy institute the gap between black and white unemployment has not changed that much in the last 50 years. in 1963 the jobless rate was 5% for whites and 11% for blacks. and today, 6.6% of the white population are unemployed compared to the 12.6% for african-americans. a professor of public policy at rutgers, bill, good to see you. >> nice to see you, ali. >> i want to pick up on a point that stacey made there. as this darker, younger part of our population grows, we all will depend on them to be prosperous and taxpayers and consumers to keep the economy going. it's to all of our detriment that blacks have not made greater advances economically. >> i teach my students macroeconomics, productivity, how much can we make and how much can we make and population growth brings economic growth. we slowed our investments in priorities, and now it's all americans we've been slowing. that lower productive thity, the demography has been changing, and growing growing growing, we're not investing in those individuals or making it hard for invest. >> stacey said that martin luther king asked the government for a $30 billion plan that was going to create--sounds like a conversation we could be having today. it didn't happen then, it didn't happen now. what can we do? it's not a government job any more. this is about the private sector. >> well, to some degree it is a government job. if you take the sequestration conversation, we already had 1 trillion-dollar cuts over the past few years and cuts going forward. one of the key toe holds that, americans and particularly women was the public sector. we've been pulling back in those jobs. >> that might be why they're getting disproportionately hurt. you're a labor economist. are you surprised we have not had bigger gains in the last 50 years? >> well, we've ebbed and flowed. when dr. king made his speech in '63, we had our best economy, 1969. that was prior to 2000 2000, th3 to '69, that was th the best prosperity we've seen. policies were implemented to spread those gains out shared prosperity, broad base prosperity. but then we lost our conscience. we lost our conscience around coalition. in the late 1970s and 80s. >> it became about ourselves. >> exactly. >> it became about individual prosperity. >> yes, a friend of mine who is a historian at yale we begin to shift the risk back to families, back to individuals. now they are much less resilient when super storm sandy comes or much less resilient when enron comes along. thanks bill. joining on thursday i'll dig in seattle's massive underground project and tell you whether mega projects solve america's infrastructure crisis. i'm ali velshi. see you then on real money. >> detroit is in bankruptcy. who will catch the retirees as their pension had hang in the balance? [♪ music ] >> so much is riding on this issue, and our community has a lot to say about it. >> yes, this is the battle for detroit's future. who are the victims? who are responsible? and most of our economy seems to be empathizing with jonathan. retireeretirees are in now
Al Jazeera America
Aug 24, 2013 2:00am EDT
more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> the political scandal that has gripped los angeles says filner's trouble, far from over. >> the ag's office won't specify charges but that an investgation is ongoing. meanwhile, city officials here in san diego say they are ready to put the civic nightmare behind them. the city council unanimously approved a resolution in which bob filner resigned effective august 30th. under the terms of the deal, the city will pay for his legal defense with regard to claims by current and former city employees. however, the city can seek reimbursement from filner from any damages arising from the mayor's alleged sexual harassment conduct. in addition, the city has put a cap of $98,000 for any outside legal counsel that bob filner may seek. during today's meeting, the mayor got up and addressed the crowd. at times, he was emotional. at other times, he was defiant. >> the mayor also apologized to his victims. he apolo
Al Jazeera America
Aug 27, 2013 6:00pm EDT
united states, but it is not all bad news. ali velshi will explain when we come back. and when we come back efforts to distinguish the rim fire around yosemite. ... s ... more news. ♪ ♪ >> and welcome back everyone, in business news stocks took another hit over the international community's reaction to the chemical weapons attack in syria. the dow tumbled 170 points, the steepest decline since june 20th. but there were a couple of bright spots, ali velshi will be talking more about this on "real money" at the top of the hour. ali, so there were some optimism out there? >> yeah, 170 points sounds like a lot, but this is a market that has just been charging ahead this year. so it doesn't need too many reasons to pull back a little bit. it's all the last week of august. so i don't want anybody to read too much into it, but some investors are worried about what further involvement in syria means. and oil had its biggest gain in about a year and a half. but we have consumer confidence. and the great thing about that is i don't have to explain it to anybody. consumers are feeling mo
Al Jazeera America
Aug 25, 2013 1:00pm EDT
there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> welcome back to al-jazeera. i'm del walters. there are more accusations by snowden on nsa spying. he says 450 communications from the u.n. headquarters were also compromised. and at this hour, a train has derailed in russia -- mexico injuring commuters but it can not be determined what caused the derailment. >>> the trial of hosni mubarak was adjourned until september 14th. here is jonathan betz with more on the court hearings today. >> two big stories here in court today concerning hosni mubarak. the first one, the charges for the deaths of protestors for the uprising in 2011. he appears in court wearing sunglasses and in a cage. there were questions as to whether he would appear in court but he did to make it clear to the court and those watching as it is streamed across egypt that he will face those charges. meanwhile, morsi's hearing was very brief. charges were simply rea
Al Jazeera America
Aug 20, 2013 5:30pm EDT
ajinsi ajinsidestory am. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> al jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. introduces america tonight. >> in egypt police fired tear gas -- >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >> they risk never returning to the united states. >> we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, can fracking change what you pay for water each month? have you thought about how climate change can affect your grocery bill? can rare minerals in china affect your cell phone bill? or how a hospital in texas could drive up your healthcare premium? i'll make the connections from the news to your money real. >> after the tazreen fire, walmart announced that it had dropped success apparel as a supplier. we tried to speak to success' representative in bangladesh, but we found the company had closed down its office here. we also tried to interview the company's ceo, gila goodman, in new york but she refused to speak with us. kevin taxin was success' president at the time of the fire. he also refused to speak to us on camera. he now heads up another supplier called americo group. one of its clients...is walmart. >> if walmart were really so upset about what success apparel did, one assumes they would not be keen to continue to do business with a leading executive from success apparel. >> on the phone, kevin told us that neither success nor its agent in bangladesh, true colors, knew about the subcontract to tazreen. but we managed to track down true colors' last remaining employee in dhaka. >> if there's any subcontracting, would you be aware of that? >> yeah. >> and then what do you do with that information? do you pass it up? >> yeah. we pass it up to our importer. >> so can you read this email for me and tell me who it's from? >> ok, it's saying hi kanta, i heard the shocking news about the fire last evening. it's nov 26. >> and what's the subject line of the email? >> fire at subcon. >> subcon is industry-speak for subcontractor. that email was sent by a manager at true colors shortly after the fire. so despite success' denials, their own agent may have been aware of the sub-contract to tazreen. mission.ç] we are on the trail investigating how walmart's supply chain works here in bangladesh. does the company know when its orders are being subcontracted? is the way they source their clothing- the system itself -flawed? the garment industry is notoriously secretive, so we needed an insider. we're on our way to meet an auditor. he was hired by wal-mart to assess standards at some of its factories. it's very rare for auditors to speak on the record and he doesn't want to speak to us on camera. so we recorded the conversation secretly in bangladesh, government regulation of garment factories is lax, and international companies are not legally required to ensure working conditions are safe. some companies hire auditors to inspect the factories. >> the purchasing system of walmart is very complex. >> how so? >> because they rely on their agents. they don't source directly from the factories. that is the problem, in my opinion. because if you rely on agents, that agent sends the order to sub-agent. that sub-agent sends the order to another agent so it changes 3, 4 times. >> wdo ydo you think about their system? >> bad. >> why do you think that's bad? what's wrong with using agents? >> using agents means you don't know your entire supply chain, from where your products are coming in. you don't have any idea. that's the danger. so you have very little idea after one or two agents, you are lost in the supply chain. >> from what you're saying it sounds like walmart's supply chain is so out of control that there could be more tazreens? >> walmart has no idea from where their goods are coming from. this is the bad and worse sentence i can say. walmart has no idea where their goods are coming from. >> well, if walmart doesn't know where its goods are being produced, it's because they choose not to know. this is a company whose success is built first and foremost on an extraordinary level of control they exert over production in their global supply chain. >>walmart refused to give us any information about its supply chain. but a spokesperson told us walmart relies on its suppliers to implement the company's standards. there's a reason bangladesh is so popular with companies, especially those that produce inexpensive clothes that need to be made quickly. >> it's the rock-bottom, cheapest place in the world to make apparel. it's cheap because it has the lowest minimum wage for apparel workers in any country in the world at 18 cents an hour >> that's about 38 dollars a month. but it goes both ways - garments are just as important to bangladesh, accounting for 80 percent of its exports and giving jobs to 4 million people, mostly poor women. that gives the industry enormous leverage inside the country >> so what they do - the retailers and buyers come here to look for the cheapest supplier. so here there is a buyer's market. everybody share -- everybody takes a share of the cake so formally we have 5 to 6 layers, but here are many hands with these layers who are taking all this money. >> it's not just the multi-nationals. in bangladesh everyone wants a shot at making it in the ga rment industry. i'm headed to a small factory that does finishing of garments. they're supposed to be finishing garments for walmart. i'm posing as a buyer to get in there. for those who can't open large factories, there's always business in sub-contracting, even if it means putting the finishing touches on garments before they're shipped out. >> do you make anything that ends up in walmart? >> yes >> you've made products that go to walmart? >> were you an authorized walmart subcontractor? >> so is this very common? that a lot of factories subcontract for big labels like walmart without authorization? >> sabina? you're 14? so you started working when you were 13 years old? >> so what's the average age of your workers? >> but we just spoke to a girl who said she's 14. >> walmart told us they don't tolerate child labor in their supply chain - and they're investigating whether this finishing center did any work on walmart products. once we found one finishing house, it wasn't hard to find others. >> what are you making? >> how many buttons do you put on everyday? >> how old are you? >> how long have you been working here? >> shewli, how old are you? >> shewli, do you go to school? >> how much money do you make here, shewli? >> 2,500 take is just 32 dollars a month. >> shewli, you're putting the elastic band into old navy pants? >> it says "old navy" >> old navy >> old navy is owned by gap inc, one of the largest clothing companies in the world. this is where a lot of america's clothes come from - and it's a reality many companies don't want us to see. this is one of very many subcontracting factories at the bottom of the supply chain in bangladesh. it seems completely unregulated, completely unauthorized. // there's no fire extinguisher, no fire exit. it's just a shack in someone's backyard. >> this morning we went to a finishing house and they had about 20 workers there. more than half of them were under 14.there were girls as young as twelve making clothes for gap. >> really? in a finishing section that you went? oh, my gosh. oh, my gosh. i mean for me, i just can't believe. so this is the time that gap should step forward to make this correct. oh, my gosh. so see how critical is the supply chain is. how critical it is. >> gap declined to give us an on-camera interview. they did give us a statement, though, saying the products we found were quote "either counterfeit or improperly acquired." but through the barcodes on the tags we found at the finishing house as well as shipping records, we were able to match the garments to ones at old navy stores in the u.s. gap added that it "strictly prohibits any vendor from employing underage workers" >> there is a fairy tale that major brands and retailers like gap and walmart tell to public. in this fairy tale gap and walmart are companies that are socially responsible and deeply committed to protecting the rights of workers and making every effort to inspect their factories and ensure that everything is on the up and up. that fairy tale has very little to do with the reality of the supply chain. for walmart, for gap, worker rights issues are not a moral issue. they're an issue of reputational risk and walmart and gap understand that their image in the eyes of the public has a very large impact on the degree to which they can get people to come to their stores and buy their goods. and so to the extent that they can be convinced that their image will be damaged if they don't do the right thing for workers, than they will make change. >> months after the tazreen fire, the memories of that disaster - and the ones that followed - are still fresh in people's minds. kalpona akter, a worker's rights activist, rushed to the scene not long after the fire began. >> it was horrific. for my experience, i think, i was crying and still you could feel the heat inside and my skin was burning. it took walmart two days to acknowledge its connection to tazreen... after photographs emerged showing its labels in the wreckage. the walmart clothes wasn't burned to ash, some others maybe, but not them. >> kalpona, like the women who survived the fire, is still haunted by what she saw that day. it's a feeling that when you are on the inside of the building you can feel that how these workers fought to remove these window bars. my feeling was like nothing could be worse than this, nothing can be worse than this. like seeing these people burnt to ash and their family crying in front of you and they cannot find, identify their bodies, whether it's their beloved or not. nobody thinks about these human faces who are making clothes for them and dying in these factories every day. nobody is talking about their compensation, nobody talking about their wages that they are getting. even they don't even consider that they're human. they have names, they have a voice. they wanted to speak out. they have right to have a safe working place. ♪ >>> hello and welcome to al jazeera, i'm tony harris. in new york our top stories at this hour. as the crisis in egypt unfolds the obama administration tries to figure out what to do with the millions in aid that goes to the ally. crews are stretched as wildfires stretch across the west, and the biggest continue to grow. plus . . . >> sometimes you get nothing, just to pay the rent. >> u.s. workers who never get a paid vacation. ♪
Al Jazeera America
Aug 21, 2013 11:00am EDT
there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. ♪ >>> recapping our top stories the military judge has sentenced private bradley manning to 35 years in prison. the leaked classified government documents to i wikileaks. along with the sentence, manning -- [ technical difficulties ] and hosni mubarak is currently being held while prosecutors investigate corruption allegations against him. if prosecutors don't appeal the ruling, mubarak could be free in the next couple of days. >>> hearings are continuing on guantanamo. on tuesday a prisoner said gr d grard -- guards are depriving him of food as torture. natasha ghoneim joining us. so natasha get us up to speed on what has happened so far. >> good morning, rochelle. attorneys have been arguing this morning that they have many concerns. they have been enumerating their concerns about their obstacles they are facing defending their clients. they are telling the judge given the lac
Al Jazeera America
Aug 24, 2013 10:00am EDT
there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >> this is just the beginning of something much bigger. >> thank god i didn't have to suffer what he had to go through. >> this sunday, the premiere of "into eternity". >> i am now in this place where you should never come. >> how do you contain 100,000 years of nuclear danger? >> it is an invisible danger. >> al jazeera america presents "into eternity". premieres sunday night 9 eastern. ... s ... my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wante
Al Jazeera America
Aug 21, 2013 4:00pm EDT
jazeera.com. >> part of the reason is a relatively small amount of money. we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars. but it is only 20% of the e.u. sends into 80% in humanitarian aid. the humanitarian aid will continue unerup uninterrupted. they didn't want to fund the regime or military entity. to $5,300,000,000 wil $5,300,00o be used in a leverage form to manipulate the way the government operates. it feels like what this might be. but we don't have a former response from them yet. >> david jackson for us in cairo. >> he is responsible for the largest leak of classified information in americans history. now army private bradley manning is sentenced to 35 years in prison. the former surveillance analysts was convicted of leaking classified government document wikileaks. we're live in washington now. mike, i heard some calling tod today, the sentence a win for bradley manning. >> the verdict is in, and the sentence has been handed down. if there is one thing that is clear from the trial and conviction of bradley manning is that the fight over government secrecy and transparency isn't close to being settled. >>> after three years of questions and controversy bradley manning came to court once more, this time to learn his fate. the sentence 35 years after being victoried o--being convicd espionage after handing classified documents over to which can leaks. ♪ chanting: bradley you are a hero. we support you. >>> video taken on board an apache helicopter in iraq, an taken that killed 11 non-combatants including two journalists and two children. the remains was outrage. judge denise lind clear manning of aiding the enemy a death penalty offense. he could be eligible for parole after a thir serving a third ofs sentence. after being found guilty he was contrite telling the judge before sentencing i'm sorry that my actions hurt people. i'm sorry i hurt the united states. in a statement read today by his lawyer manning said he'll can for a presidential pardon or to have his sentence commuted to time served. >> the decision i made in 2010 were made out of concern for my country and the world that we live in. if you deny my request for a pardon i will serve my time knowing that sometimes you have to pay a heavy price to live in a free society. >> reporter: some polls sow that americans favor manning. >> i think it's appropriate in terms of what did he. >> but free speech advocates say the case will have repercussions with other high-profile whistle blowers. >> he basically said he didn'--d snowden said he didn't want to be an example like bradley manning. >> reporter: after the manning episode the debate continues onn national security and the public's right to know. >>> josh earnest said there is a process if he applies for a pardon, it will be considered like every other application. >> what, if anything, julian assange the founder of wikileaks is saying about the sentence. >> that is a very good question, and it's a interesting response, wikileaks is the other central player and julian assange. he calls it a tactical victory. he said the acquittal on that charge of aiding the enemy was a tactical victory by the defense, and by his calculation bradley manning will only serve 5.2 years. this is what else he says. while the defense should be proud of their tactical victory it should be remembered that bradley manning's trial and conviction is an affront to western justice. as far as julian assange is concerned, it's a mixed bag. >> the man who leaked the pentagon papers which showed misconduct in the vietnam war daniel ellsberg spoke to us earlier today. >> i expected to go to prison for life, and i was faced for charges that totaled 115 years possible in prison, just like bradley manning who faced at one point life plus 186 of years, and now down from 90 to 60 that the prosecution viciously i would say proposed down to an equally unjust 35 years. so i was sitting in the same place he was. >> we are learning new details about the activities of the nsa, the agency collected thousands of internet communications with no terror connections. the intent was to go far beyond what it had originally disclosed. we'll go deeper in that side of the story later in this newscast. the soldiers that killed 16 afghan civilians in a rampage last year faced more of his victims' families. the trial for sergeant bales has recessed for the day. there are 30 counts of murder, attempted murder and assault. allen schauffler is life for us, how likely is the jury to grant a possibility. you talk to others who know the military system, and they say simply no way. considering what he did. this man will get life in prison, period. they stopped hearing testimony for the day right now. we did hear from a couple of witnesses from afghanistan this morning. now we're hearing the other side, the defense's turn, and they're putting a human face on the monster the robert bales we've heard described by a whole string of prosecution witnesses. good time bobby is what his oldest brother named him today while he was on the stand. we heard a neighbor of his from his boyhood. he broke challenged son. >> bales has not apologized for the rampage, but are there any signs that one might actually come at his sentencing? >> i appreciate it, allen schauffler for us. >>> a family member of bales victims are struggling with their loss. they're calling for the death sentence. >> reporter: in the early morning hours of march 11, 2012, sergeant robert bales killed 16 afghans. nine of them were children. four were women. among the men was this man's brother, mohammed dawi. >> this person should be sentenced to death. any other sentence given to him is not satisfactory to us. >> he no longer lives here, but the rest of the victims' relatives memories were too difficult. the people know how bales should be promised. >> it's obvious. he should be given the death penalty for sure because tomorrow someone else will do the same thing. he should be punished and everyone in afghanistan should see it. >> he should be given the death penalty, and then the people would trust the government and support it. it would be a good thing if he was given the death penalty. >> authorities moved quickly to calm the relatives. kandahar police gave money for funerals and the u.s. offered compensation, too,. >> $50,000 for the death and $12,000 for each of the wounded. >> paying blood money sometimes brings forgiveness, but not in this case. >> if he's not given the death sentence then there should an retrial and this person should be given the death penalty. >> reporter: a retrial for bales is highly unlikely. the families say they'll appeal international courts and human rights organizations afghan lawyers here in kabul are divided. some are familiar with the case. others don't understand the american plea bargaining system, but all agree if bales had been tried in afghanistan he would have been hanged along ago. al jazeera, kabul. >> firefighters continue to battle wildfires across idaho. officials say 1,250 homes remain evacuated in areas of the resort of ketchum and sun valley due to a large wildfire burning nearby. firefighters could use some help from the conditions, let's check in with rebecca. >> meteorologist: it does look good for idaho right now. we're looking at dry conditions set up for idaho. states that had fire season begin fairly early in june and july. let's take a look at the drought map. we have dry ground going from southern idaho southeast oregon down into nevada. and that's exactly where we're concerned about thunderstorms tonight. the moisture off oh shor offshos spinning thunderstorms into the areas where we would not like to see lightening strikes. now there are fire concerns because lightening strikes without a lot of rain can start a new one. >> thank you. coming up on al jazeera, just three words, we will tell you what army major in a da nadal hs said in his own defense. >> welcome back, everyone, former army major nadal hassan spoke just three words t at his trial today. the defense rests. prosecutors brought nearly 90 witnesses and he called none of his own. the army cak psychiatrist admitd he was the shooter in his opening statement. he faces 13 counts of murder and 32 counts of attempted murder. closing arguments begin tomorrow. al jazeera we're live in fort hood. hassan has not really helped himself in clear himself in his case when he passed on the chance to defend himself. he wanted to tell jurors that he killed u.s. soldiers to save lives in afghanistan, but the judge deemed that irrelevant. he was limited to addressing the facts of the case. facts the accused agrees with. most observers would call this an unique trial. not own is hassan representing himself, he also told the jury on day one that he is the shooter. hassan is charged with 13 murders, 12 of the victims were soldiers. one was a civilian who rushed to hassan to try to stop the shooting. prosecutors made it a seen of heroism and chaos during the attack. 89 prosecution witnesses took the stands. a police officer who shot the attacker in the happened preventing him from reloading and allowing her partner to take him down. one by one the victims walked past hassan in his wheelchair. some looked at him in the eye, and all described him as the shooter. hassan declined to call any defense witnesses. he declined to present a case. hassan, a former army psychologist, said he wants the jury to consider capital charges and not lesser penalties. the former army major said he could not because this is a capital case and they cannot accept guilty pleas for chance. >> appreciate it. thank you. nfl comes down hard on what they consider a dirty play. michael eaves is here. >> they're trying to limit some of that violence. antonio smith who made the last two pre-season games after the nfl suspended him from this violent attack. smith ripped off the helmet and hit him with it during a pre-season game on saturday. >>> in baseball detroit manager jim leyland said miguel cabrera suffered some lower body injury in the loss to the twins. no word if he'll play tonight as he chase as second straight triple crown. >>> and the best little league baseball team in the world. we'll have that and much more coming up in sports in 20 minutes. occupied-- >> al jazeera america. is did. >> this is the hundred page document we call obamacare. and my staff has read the entire thing. can congress say the same? >> "real money with ali velshi" tonight on al jazeera america. >> welcome back, this is a look at the top stories on al jazeera. recapping now the united nations security council is holding an emergency meeting sawing saying hundreds of people attacked the european union have expressed grave concern about the reports of the use of chemical weapons in syria. they will insure an investigation. >> a former egyptian president has anhosni mubarak will be reld from house arrest. the prosecutors say the constitution prevents them from appealing the ruling. we're learning new activities from the nsa. today we learned it the agency connected thousand of internet communications in the u.s. with no terror connections. the intent of the program was to intercept terrorist communications. we go to karen, the direct ever of the center of th of school o. are we surprised of what we're learning particularly over the last four months, and at some point we've got to decide just at what point do we get truly outraged? >> we're not surprised. maybe that's the surprise, we're not surprised but continually troubled. partly what we're troubled by is we don't know the facts. we hear pieces of facts but then we have suspicions. every time we have suspicions two months later they become factual. it's a troubling situation. >> is it a step in the right direction that we're learning some details about what the nsa is doing before it was all in secrecy? >> between the decision of the court this afternoon to release these documents, for these court documents to be released and reporting by a number of journalists we're sort of learning the contours of this, but we still don't know what was filtered out. we still don't know what was actually meta-data and content of e-mails. we don't know which americans were surveilled and what information was kept. we have suspicions and we know bits and pieces but we really do not know what this story is. >> then there is the other side of the equation where the nsa is issuing statements ere they're saying in effect we are doing this to protect american lives and to beat back the forces of those who would harm this country. >> right. we're still in a post 9/11 moment. we still, as a country, still seem to believe that any kind of tradeoff of security and liberty may be the best trade-off. but you have to ask yourself if there is going to be this kind of surveillance, then how is it possible that we have the boston marathon attack be successful. >> you can't get everything. you can cast a wide net and you can't get everything. >> that's what they say, and that's true, but you can't get everything. therefore it's not useful to have this what they call needle in a haystack approach. it's not useful to have the hay tack. the question is how can we do this in a way that is constitutional, and that protects the rights of citizens. and i think americans may be at the place where they understand that there is--they don't have zero risk tolerance. >> don't we need a better explanation as to why we collect thousands of bits of information from the internet that is not terror related. there needs to be an explanation of that. you wonder if the fisa court is aware of this and signing off on this. >> it's not just terrorism but national security in a larger sense, foreign agents, spice, it's not just terrorism. but it's national security. we need to know there are regulatory agencies and mechanisms in place to make sure that the kind of filtering that goes on goes on. we need to know to your point that there is an ability to collect information in a way that we can analyze it, and that's the problem here. is this making us selfer? >> karen greenberg as director of th the national security and school of law. thank you for your time. >>> as many as 2,000 people are thought to be held in prison camps and torture is common in these camps. we have testimonies of former detainees. here is our story. >> reporter: north korea defectors accounted their experience in one of the most repressive regimes in the world. there are no known pictures of what happens in these camps, but these draws based on inmates testimony prid provide a sketchy window into that world. this man said that excus executs were normal and he feared he would be next. another man was tortured being accused of being a spy. >> i was tortured in various ways but the most painful was when my hands were handcuffed to my back. i could not sit or stand. i was left for three or four days. that was the most painful torture. >> reporter: both men were held in labor camp 16. is lie 100 kilometers northeast of pyongyang. surrounded by mountain ranges. human rights activist have documented treatment going on in political camps thought to hold between 1500 to 2,000 people. >> we will leave no stone unturned, and then we will give notice to the government of north korea so they are on notice and have due process and have an opportunity to respond in detail not just general rejection that this is a hostile act because it's an act of the whole world community, but a reaction which will be appropriately detailed to all the evidence that we are gathering. >> reporter: the north korean government has always denied the existence of political concentration camps. so far it shows little willingness to look at its human rights record. >> reporter: they say they provide an authoritative account of conditions in north korea, and they hope whatever recommendation they make that will help the world take notice and put pressure on north korea to change their ways. al jazeera, seoul. >> somalia is on the verge of a healthcare crisis. doctors without borders which provides everything from basic medical supplies to facilities is pulling out of the country. the group said that conditions are just too dangerous. >> there is a widespread of disregard of humanitarian action. as a result we are not able to insure the safety of our team. also we have not been able to for a while now carry out independent assessments of need. >> hospitals only have a few months of supplies, and funding left before the organization stops its support. last year the program provided treatment for more than 600,000 people and admitted 40,000 somalis in to its hospitals. here to explain the rationale behind this decision is executive director of doctors without borders. it's great to see you. that's a big decision. tell me about it. >> it's a big decision. >> how did you come to it? >> it's heart backing for us. >> for 22 years we have a' been involved in somali providing assistance. in numerous occasions we've gone through assisted with security. we have considered pulling out, but we've maintain activity. today we decided it was time to withdraw from the country because we consider that we don't have sufficient confidence that our presence will be respected, and our workers won't be affected. we're a high-risk taking organization. we know taking risk is part of our work, but we also believe that the only way to met gate these risks is to get the sufficient level of respect and protection from the leaders who claim to be in control of the area. and today we don't have that stability. >> have you lost any workers. >> we've lost 16, and we believe now we have reached our limits and we don't have enough guarantees for success. >> do you feel that your personnel is actively being targeted? >> we do. we do feel that these have been targeted attacks against the organization, against workers in general. but because we are a provider of aid in somalia we've been very much exposed, and we also accepted a number of risks and compromises that we never accepted in any other countries, and today we believe it's time to stop. >> if there is a country that needs your help, it's certainly somalia. what happens to the people now? >> definitely the people will pay the highest price in its leaders to provide health services. >> that country is not equipped to do that. >> no, they're not equipped, and as you say we provided services to 600,000 people last year. so it will be critical for the population there. >> is there a chance you might revisit? >> you know, it's not in the dna of the organization to withdraw from a country where there are so many needs, it's quite the opposite. we would definitely consider going back to somalia if we have a sufficient level of confidence that we could work in acceptable conditions there. >> that's a difficult decision, but we appreciate you coming and talking us ther through it. >> there is much more ahead. the typhoid cancer be on rise in japan following the nuclear disaster and the annual rite of summer. we'll take to you williamsport, pennsylvania, where some of the world's best baseball talent is ready to compete for the championship. [♪ music ] mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> japan's nuclear regulatory agency has upgraded the severity level of the radioactive water leak. it follows a large leak of radioactive water. we have more. >> reporter: 300 cubic meters of water contaminated with dangerously high levels of radiation is leaked from the fukushima plant. the regulatory authority said this is a serious incident and not necessarily one that could have been prevented. >> it's not a situation where we increase our monitoring there wouldn't be accidents. it's very well t to predict thee things but they keep happening one after another. >> reporter: they upgraded their incident, they still don't know how the radioactive water got out. but enough water to fil fill an olympic-sized pool in a week has some how reached the metal tanks even though they've been reinforced with concrete barriers and sound bars. they suspect the water got through a valve connected to a gutter, now the water outside is so toxic it would expose a person to more radiation in an hour than is healthy in five years. it has leaked through the barrier and into the sea. >> it has definitely reached the pacific, now they may need to increase the area that would not be allowed to fish any more into it. >> the cabinet secretary said that the government will do what it can. >> any
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Aug 20, 2013 4:00pm EDT
hemorrhaging money. ali velshi is here with that story for us. a business that has been dwen ling for years, and so they decided to bring in ron johnson. the problem is jcpenney isn't apple.k to their baseline and then try to grow and compete. >> are there any signs of a tur serious pessimistics and worri? i'm going to discuss that tonight. >> good to be with you again. ali velshi. thank you, sir. >> all right. >>> and a brighter future perhaps for another iconic american company. a federal judge has allowed kodak to go into bankruptcy protection. >> reporter: kodak is most famous for pioneering consumer photography. manies of people around the world have recorded their own kodak moment? but a snapshot of the recent past shows a company trying to catchup with the digital world. in 1975 one of the engineers invented digital photography, but management failed to spot the significance. >> they didn't recognize that digital was going to come into the market and replace film, figuring that we don't want to hurt the film business, which is where they make their money. it was just devastatin
Al Jazeera America
Aug 30, 2013 11:00pm EDT
syria sending oil prices through the roof. ali velshi has a look at that next. and the pittsburgh pirates who posted 21 consecutive losing seasons. this year their sights are set much higher than just a winning record. al jazeera america - a new voice in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. . can you say stocktopussy? >> an interesting debate. coming up, a school where students don't read books. instead they use ipads almost >>> in business, tensions the in syria have been pushing oil prices higher. "real money" ali velshi has more. >> all the the attention oh on syria have brought in to to oil. before settling at $107.65 a barrel. this as officials in the obama administration issued statements talki
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Aug 26, 2013 6:00pm EDT
velshi will be talking more about this in "real money with ali velshi." but we want to talk to him about it right now. is this really? >> well look, durable goods are interesting. everything we spend in our economy divides in three buckets, services. everybody knows what they are. consumables, which is what i mostly eat, and durable goods which are things that in theory last you more than three years. so i happen to think, look, it doesn't have the cache of unemployment or these housing numbers that we talk about all the time, but to be informed about the economy you have you do have to follow all of these little windows into the economy, and durable goods is one of them. that's why this caught my attention today. that number is down more than we might have expected. >> is there an impact on jobs by this number. >> more than half of the drop came from civilian aircraft orders. that's very volatile. one of the things about this normal is that it's volatile. services stay roughly the same. this is the what you goes up and down because of a big aircraft order or big sales in cars. most of t
Al Jazeera America
Aug 20, 2013 8:00pm EDT
there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. sure that stories don't escape them. >> every day a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you heard angles you hadn't considered. consider this, antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo. stories that matter to you. ♪ >>> the sentencing phase for robert bales began this afternoon. he pleaded guilty to murdering 16 afghan civilians last year. prosecutors went through the crimes bales committed offering details of how he broke into homing chasing victims. the youngest victim just 12 years old. tanya today's proceedings we should hear from more of them as the testimony continues. we heard from the elder who described in great detail his family members being shot. at one time he broke down in tears and walked out of the courtroom. we also heard from a 15-year-old boy resume tomorrow. >> tanya thank you for that up tait. >>> ch
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Aug 24, 2013 8:00am EDT
first. the next several days of this momentous occasion. ali velshi is
Al Jazeera America
Aug 21, 2013 4:00am EDT
>> welcome to al jazeera. here is your news on the hour. i'm stephanie sy. army private first class bradley manning will find out how long he has to spend behind bars for leaking classified information. the judge will announce the sentence at 10:00 a.m. eastern. prosecutors have requested that he get at least 60 years. >>> a toxic warning has been upgraded at the fukushima water plant. it has been upgraded to the level three. >>> president obama met with his national security team to discuss cutting some of the $1.5 billion in eight that the u.s. sends to egypt every year. the house has not made any final decisions. >>> more than 50 wildfires are burning across the country. the two in idaho are considered top priority. the u.s. has spent a billion dollars fighting fires this year. we'll have complete news coverage for you at 7:00 a.m. eastern, and of course you can always follow us any time by logging on to our website at www.america.aljazeera.com. i'm stephanie sy in new york. you're watching al jazeera news. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, can fracking change what you pay for water each month? have you thought about how climate change can affect your grocery bill? can rare minerals in china affect your cell phone bill? or how a hospital in texas could drive up your healthcare premium? i'll make the connections from the news to your money real. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >>they share it on the stream. >>social media isn't an afterthought. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet for those conversations. >>post, upload, and interact. >>every night, share undiscovered stories. >> now to meet a population that rarely wants much attention. thousands of prisoners in california joined a mass hunger strike this summer. 70 inmates have refused to eat for 40 days now. they are trying to end to a policy of keeping alleged gang members in solitary co solitaire confinement for years nap will not bring an end for better treatment behind bars. it's not just in california. new orleans, the justice, department, mayor and all sheriff are all battling over jail reforms. adam went inside one of the worst jails in america. >> this is a troubleed the faciltroubleed thetroubleed the. >> it causes social problems and less fundings for parks, schools and -- the sheriff who runs that jail in new orleans in is in the hot seat. they give a caution night that the content in this report is graphic and may be disturbing. in the shadow -- keep those people in. keep people like that around. >> reporter: the perish prince called opp by the locals. >> why do they want to keep them? >> nobody want use to know what's going none side these places. >> reporter: experts hired by the u.s. justice department call this the most dangerous jail in america. thank you for having us. "america tonight" takes a rare look inside. now now cameras have been allowed behind these barbed wire fences. >> they beat me up. i have bruises on me. let them know. >> reporter: violence here, an every day event. it's built africa tre "katrina ." >> guys are houseed in this area. the state of louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the entire country. twice the u.s. average. 38,000 people come through opp every year. according to federal investigators 40 inmates have died here since 2006. 25 prisoners hospitalized every month. jail had 698 prisoner assaults is last year including 32 stabbings. this photo shows a resent stabbing at the jail. they issued a statement of super official cuts. in this crowded dorm full of two guards are on duty. now, who watches the inmates while you've been here from way u up there? horror story here are documented in federal lawsuits. tk*u rel reshard a low level drug offender who was just released was sexually assaulted at opp. >> this was another inmate. he woke me up early in morning and told me to get in the shower and saying that i was -- you have to do this. i was forced to get up and get in the shower. after i get in the shower i notice that he has a shank and he takes it and he places it by the entrance of the shower as if i didn't come fly of what he was saying. >> reporter: rashard is 100 former prisoners who testified in the class-action lawsuit and the prisoners at opp. it was final -- and the u.s. justice department joined the lawsuit charging violent, inhumane prison k-rpbg prison conditions, excessive force. >> an inmate performed oral sex on a lot of guys on that tier and another inmate who was definitely schizophrenic and on drugs down here and had a broom stick shoveed is up his rectum. >> look, there's some great stories. we investigate every single allegation. >> reporter: sheriff martin gusman runs the prison. as a reformer and the city's first black sheriff, some local officials say he's now the problem. gusman says the allegations of danger and neglect are over -- >> reporter: inside these prisons since 2007. >> well, yes they would have you to think that these were all deaths related to violence. violence. we have groups like the southern center that tweak the truth for their own purposes to make people like you and your audience think that when they look at a number like that that that's somehow wrong. >> reporter: but u.s. justice department statistics show the mortality rate for prisoners here at opp is among the highest in the u.s. >> reporter: earlier this year public outrage grew when this video was released to the media. it was filmed coming at will . behind bars inmates not only showed up from a prison cell but somehow they obtained a handgun and violently waving it around. the laundry problem at opp has led to a number of protests. >> opp has things to be a house of horrors. >> it's salaries that we're paying to jail people who -- should be paying our community. >> reporter: the mayor wants the sheriff out. >> some of the elected officials in this town have been highly critical of you. are you handling it? >> the mayor has his own agenda. i won't get in to what his agenda is. i have a record of public service in this community. >> as the jail been poised? >> i'm not sure what you you mean by that. >> i mean criticized. >> i think this is a tough one. i think one someone stumbled and that's usually some people's opportunity to take a hit at them and we've had some stumbles. there's no doubt about it. >> reporter: earlier this year sheriff gusman resigned the lawsuit to reform opp. th procedures. mental health reform and health care and more . >> in taking progress center. >> reporter: government is pumping $145 million-dollars in to the jail. sheriff gusman says the new facility -- but they stay the jail won't have proper medical and mental health facilities. they also take issue with the size of the new -- it will still capita. >> this is where the security will be. >> this is where the deputy will be here. >> okay. >> and there will be additional security behind here. >> reporter: he is skeptical. he spent 27 years behind bars. since his release, he's an advocate for prison reform. >> i people start being prosecuted and being sued and litigating against because of the conditions in jail. that's when all the attention come. i blame this administration. i blame this mayor. i i blame the city council. the sheriff inheriteded a bad situation but he hasn't made it any better earth. >> reporter: new orleans has the third highest murder rate in the u.s. and some neighborhoods, violent crime is part of every day life. problem. because when people come out of jail that have been misused and abused, that person is in a bad place. >> reporter: can they fix this jail? in the overall city in new orleans. >> completely. a lot of the problems that we have in the city is from this prison. >> reporter: the rate distporbs rate effects after cannes. one of seven of black are locked up, on probation or on parol. >> we need to have a conversation and literally, hey, they are in incarceration. >> reporter: right. sheriff gusman says he is -- he resides over a jail what orleans. >> it's in a condition to turn someone who is channel individual rights of freedoms is also responsibility for the incarceration. >> reporter: are you hopeful if the day that this facility is too big. >> i'm hopeful for the day that there are very few people in here and the smaller the people. >> we have to take a real hard this. what that look like? and what it does to an overall community. just right there on the front of the state and watch the traffic that flows through there. ddo we have a bad system. >> even though the sheriff, the mayor and the u.s. department of justice all originally agreed to this consent and they are back in court and fighting over details and the price tag. it is estimated that the federal over sight of opp could cost more than $100 million-dollars. now the mayor of new orleans can do it cheaper if the sheriff is dismissed. of course, we wanted to to talk about his claims. he did not respond to our are repeated request for an interview on this report. >> adam we will continue to follow up. thanks very much. >> yes, we will. >> next on "america tonight" could it be a medical break through? it already saved one young woman's life. >> nine months after treatment it was definitely favorable . >> what doctors say one deadly disease to with an autographed jersey, and obama shared a few praise. >> coach shula retired with more wins than any coach in history. each time that record has been challenged, team after team has fallin short. >> michael eaves joins us to talk more about that. the president was having a lot pakistan charged musharaff. >>> crews rushed to contain a 300-ton radio active leak. plant oporators say it already o absorbed the con tap absorbed contaminated water. >> more than three are diagnosed with cancer some time in their lives. it is most often -- and he sh*e says to a revolutionary therapy. one that employs a very unlikely force for good. it's in the spring until 2011. >> i notice that my eyes would hurt really pad. pain. >> the headaches became so painful that stephanie went to local er. >> i hit my knees. >> doctors found the tumor in june and operated almost e immediately. fears. >> any time you say it's cancer you automatically think worst. >> it was actuall actually -- a very tumor. >> for years she battled the tumor with radiation and chemotherapy. congressional therapies that 95% inevidenceible. >> in april of 2012 i was giveen the news that my cancer had come back. >> this disease, especially when it returns after surgery, chemotherapy is uniformly lethal. >> but developed by cancer research said at duke university gave me -- it is over and not per tpeblgt. >> enter the doctor who is seeking to use one deadly disease to battle another. >> by training with polio , but have readjusted the cancer. i'm particularly interested. >> it's natural enough to do anything to it. it naturally like toes tp-bgt cancer cells and it kills them. >> but the evadeing polio virus triggers the patients own immune. >> it nation tumor . it's putting a catheter in to the area of the tumor . >> polio killed it. i didn't think the idea. >> she's like what? you're putting polio in my daughter eardaughter's brain. are you serious? i got used to that idea. it it was decision. >> the doctor actually came in and explained it to me and i was just amazed. why not try it. >> it had not been used on a human and only done on it and us. >> over a six-hour period. a surgeon entered it in to stephanie's brain. hao when stephanie was treated. i it was one to deliver the virus, it gave me an idea that we were doing the right thing. we studied this s so thoroughly. >> the months after the infusion the tumor appeared to be growing. >> it's something wants to see and i have to be honest, it was not something we were happy about, of course. very concerned. >>> we treat this cancer which is very aggressive and can hurt my patient. when i was seeing the tumor growing it was scary for me to sit back and have faith that the polio virus is working. >> what was actually happening was -- it was rather than -- >> the response was exactly as predicted. virus. >> this is a diabolic disease. the fact that she responded to a virus is remarkable because this is not something that was achieveable. the type of treatment that's currently available with the cancer patients. >> that whole area here is treated. and how it's gone. i'm really pleased. >> yeah. >> there are 7 months that they have worked with some signs and 9 months after treatment we knew that she was responding. >> he suggests that what he recognizes and destroys it, it won't return. production lasting response is only in cancer -- that's what we want. we don't stop at brain tumors. we want to investigate the use of the techniques or will make a dent that is incureable cancer. >> if stephanie will remain due nor free, his technique can help a whole range of cancers including prostate cancer and more. stephanie has survived a year and a half. four times longer than most people and she remains in perfect health. >> i survived cancer. i'm a cancer survivor and it's not just cancer but brain cancer. and, people look up to me and i've grown up. not only have i matured more but i found out who my friends were and realized i can do thing if i can beat cancer. >> i'm glad to see that. other patients are now being evaluated to participate in the polio virus trial. so one of them did it like stephanie did. we're told the treatment didn't help two patients who had damaged immune systems and it's too early to tell about remaining four. but animal studies says that body and destroys a tumor will not return. joining us here is dr. james gulley from the national cancer institute. we are excited to see feoff any's excitement and to see the patients. so many are looking to does and saying is this the cure? >> yes, so, i think that this is a very interesting study. i think all of them by hope but when we have a study like this where you see 8 patients that's important to follow the patients for a longer period of time and get more experience with this i think is very early interesting. >> you mentioned this experimental treatments. they are not used in a very widespread way. >> that's right. so, unfortunately in the united states only about 5% of adult patients go on to clinical. >> so it could take some the time. this is also interesting because this is not what we conventionally think chemotherapy . therapy. i think a complete difference with the standard therapies. first of all, chemotherapy is the term. where as these immune therapies don't. tumor. >> so, in this case, you're saying it the revolutionary put you have concerns about future of this treatment? >> i think we need to continue to see more patients. i think that thus far we've seen evidence of safety of giving the polio virus directly in to the brain. i think that's very important. i think that studies are going to further define how effective this is. i think it's very interesting that we're seeing promising results as in stephanie's case. >> and in nci, the national cancer institute you would be following that. give a time line. how long does it take to go from something that's called an experimental to a commonplace? >> so generally what we do is the first study, phase i study to safety and then phase ii we look at evidence and with fist phase iii with therapy and with the patient study until phase iii study is complete. >> you have to have a certain map of case that you can study and determine what it is. >> absolutely. >> so, eight cases. where does it end your overall understanding as complex and important as brain cancers. >> so this is a very good first step. usually with these early studies, we just looked to see if they're safer and when we see early evidence of of effectives we will be excited about this. >> we know that you will continue to watch as well. dr. james gulley coming in and talking with us about that. >> thank you. >> up here in america tonight, a deadly outbreak in an country. how did it start? the harsh reality where lack of time and any basic resources will led up to a rising was not me. check us out 24 hours a day on my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas, and i'm an associate producer for america tonight. i grew up in a very large, loud indian family. they very much taught me how to have a voice, and from a very young age i loved writing, and i love being able to tell other people stories. the way to do good journalism is to really do your research, to know your story, to get the facts right, and to get to know the people involved in your story. america tonight and al jazeera america, it's a perfect place for that to happen. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >>they share it on the stream. >>social media isn't an afterthought. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet for those conversations. >>post, upload, and interact. >>every night, share undiscovered stories. >>> soon after the 2010 earthquake demolished haiti what little resources it had. a deadly cholera broke out. thousands of people died and tense of thousands. outbreak. he joins us here. sabastian, what is behind this? >> the cholera epidemic broke out in haiti. i was one of the first respond respond weapon weapon respondants on the ground. i went back to the human sense of the impact of this disease . >> reporter: more than two years since cholera hit haiti. it was in one of the isolated areas of the country. communities are up here in the mountains and they are almost completely cutoff from basic services. clinics, running water, even road are almost almost in existence. >> it's impossible to realize how the medical facilities have to save lives from cholera this is the kind of scenario here. we are on our way now to the funeral at the very top of this mountain far man who didn't make it. when he died from cholera, -- the team in this tiny mountain top village and a father of three. he fell ill just days ago from his house. it's about five miles to the clinic. >> . >> they say they have been around 200 cholera deaths since the disease appeared. as a u.n. that flies over the funeral and nobody had idea how the out break started . as with many of the communities, death has become part of every day life. but that doesn't lesson the grief. [ cry ] >> his coffin carried up the mountain. his eldest leading the way. [ traditional singing ] >> they hav
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Aug 29, 2013 8:30am EDT
ali velshi. jazeera.com. >> this is aljazeera. ♪ theme >> hello, welcome to the news hour. the clamor for military action over the suspected chemical attack in syria gross. british politicians gather to debate intervening. there are signs of preparations, british jets have arrived in cypress. >> one of the most wanted men in india was arrested after five years on the run. >> i'm in new orleans. it's a city struggling to recover from hurricane
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Aug 30, 2013 8:00am EDT
points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> we have been talking about syria all morning, but we have some developing news coming out of egypt. protests in support of ousted egyptian president mohamed morsi are taking plagues in the country. police have closed entrances into cairo and shut down metro stations in tahrir square to contain the protestors. flash style protests are being held in order to avoid fighting with police. >> eight years ago, hurricane katrina slammed into the gulf coast. more than 1800 people died in one of the worst natural disasters in this nations history. the city is still recovering. some very creative people have gone to the big easy to help drive its revival. >> he's come a long way since helping his father fix up houses in vermont. he's a respected furniture designer with a booming business. >> this material is what makes my work beautiful to me. >> he was drawn to n
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Aug 31, 2013 2:00am EDT
go to www.aljazeera.com. ali velshi is next with real money. instead they use ipads almost
Al Jazeera America
Aug 21, 2013 2:00am EDT
there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. [♪ music ] >> major developments out of japan regarding the water leak out of the fukushima water plant. the warning has been raised from the level one to a level three. the level three category means the exposure is ten times the amount for workers. they have not issued a warning of this time since the re
Al Jazeera America
Aug 22, 2013 5:00pm EDT
are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> al jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. introduces america tonight. >> in egypt police fired tear gas -- >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >> they risk never returning to the united states. >> we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. with an autographed jersey, and obama shared a few praise. >> coach shula retired with more wins than any coach in history. each time that record has been challenged, team after team has fallin short. >> michael eaves joins us to talk more about that. the president was having a lot >>> welcome back to "inside story." nasa scientists say the destructive power of these fires is here to stay and will likely get worse. earlier i spoke with nasa scientist douglas morton and asked him about how this current season fits in nasa's projections. >> we can go back in time and look at the occurrence of fires in the
Al Jazeera America
Aug 29, 2013 2:00am EDT
, www.aljazeera.com. ali velshi is next with "real money." thanks so much for watching.
Al Jazeera America
Aug 26, 2013 7:30pm EDT
americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. ♪ >>> well were always in the background. nowadays they are more up front, you know? but we still have a lot more work to do, where the civil rights, you know, need to help women. because still women are getting paid less, and the fight is just so long and hard. >> what are the issues and challenges facing black women that are different than those that the larger community faces. >> uh-huh. which raises an interesting issue, avis, it seems black women's issues are never a separate discussion from black men. why can't we talk about them separately? >> that's a critical point, and a point that was raised before, right? when we think of black issues, it is almost a cultural appropriation. when you think blackness, you tend to think black maleness, and likewise when you think of women in america, the face of womanhood in america seems to be a white women. black women are in the periphery, and until we make intentio
Al Jazeera America
Aug 27, 2013 4:00am EDT
there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. this is the 900-page document we call obamacare. it could change costs, coverage, and pretty much all of healthcare in america. my show sorts this all out. in fact, my staff has read the entire thing. which is probably more than what most members of congress can claim. we'll separate politics from policy, and just prescribe the facts. >>a. >> >> >> finally tonight we return to the place struggling with the challenges we saw earlier in this program. one community in california has already endured two severe fires in the last seven years and those blazes put pressure on two families. one that fled and lost everything, and the other chose to stay. let's go to california's twin pines. >> i looked out the window, and the tree in the front yard was laying over, and it was getting really smokey. i looked out the side window here from the living room, and it was a friggin' wall of f
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 7:30pm EDT
americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> it's a travesty to think that someone would go to court to take away pension. they worked for this for over 30 years. for someone as governor the state to go against his own constitution to try to take money from these people is a shame. >> well, detroit clearly didn't get into this financial crisis overnight. it's economic decline has been at work for decades. how did detroit get here? >> the city has had bad public policies for decades. economies collapsed, but in the past decade or so they've been bothered by an acute level of mismanagement, not being able to do the basic things that other cities in the state of michigan can do despite getting more revenue and having special rules to give the city more money than any other city in the state of michigan. they can fix that, though. it's not a permanent solution. they're getting ahold of their books. they're trying to look for better ways to provide services. they're getting
Al Jazeera America
Aug 27, 2013 1:00pm EDT
you tune in to "real money with ali velshi" to find out exactly why things on wall street are not going well and where they'll rebound between now and then. >>> an ecological nightmare is unfolding in florida. hundreds of manatees and dolphins are dying there. and thos they want to know why. >> this is ngo's indian lagoon. >> we've had over 50 bottlenose dolphin deaths in the same area, and 250 to 300 pelicans die this past spring. >> reporter: the indian river lagoon spans along central utah's east coast. the estuary and surrounding area is home to a million people who have seen the sea life disappear as the population has increased. peter is a fisherman who has felt the impact of the vanishing sea life first hand. >> i've a beautiful view, but it's not teeming with sea life but it's deep, black and flat and most of it is dead 1234 the disappearance of vast rings of sea grasses. >> we've lost sea grasses in the last two years, that's 60% of what was in the lagoon. >> they're known as the rain forests of coastal water bodies. >> reporter: politicians, scientists and concerned citi
Al Jazeera America
Aug 26, 2013 8:00am EDT
points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. was not me. check us out 24 hours a day on >> sentencing begins today for dr. nidal hasan, convicted last week for the 2009 shooting spree at ford hood that left 13 dead. thirty others were wounded in the deadly effort mass shooting ever on a military insulation. heidi zhou-castro joins us now. what can we expect in today's proceeding? >> well, morgan, today is day one of the prosecution's case for capital punishment. we know at least one family member of each of the 13 people killed by hassan will be taking the stand, plus three more of the wounded will be giving their testimony, bringing the total number of witnesses for the government to just around 20. the bigger question is what, if anything will hassan say when it's his turn. he did ask the judge for a break between the government's case and his own, indicating he is planning something, but morgan, you just nev
Al Jazeera America
Aug 23, 2013 11:00am EDT
know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> welcome back, let's recap our stop stories. the un says the there are now a million syrian children refugees. >>> and two bombs went off outside of the northern city of tripoli in lebanon. there is no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack. a jury has resumed deliberations in nidal hasan. he passed on his final chance to address the jury on thursday. he faces multiple murder charges. >>> it's being called the friday of martyrs. demonstrations take place more than a week after hundreds of people were killed. jonathan betz is live from cairo to tell us more about what is happening. jonathan in fact how large and widespread have the protests actually ended up being? >> the protests were still large, richelle but not as large as we have seen in the past. today was a big test to see how much pressure they could apply on the current government. the resistance does continue but the numbers are not as large as what we have seen in
Al Jazeera America
Aug 20, 2013 5:00pm EDT
want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. ♪ >>> welcome back to "inside story." for more than 20 years 97% of scientific research has said that climate change is happening and it is caused by people. but americans remain divided on the issue, and they are more skeptical than others around the world. 40% of americans see the change in climate as a major global threat. that's in comparison to 54% of europeans, and 65% of those surveyed in latin america. to continue this discussion, we're joined by michael mann the director of penn state's earth system science center, heidi coen, and claus jacob. why the reluctance of some americans to trust the science. >> in 2002 there was an internal memo leaked from frank luntz. and he was advising his clienting that the public was becoming convinced that there was a scientific consensus s surrounding the issue of climate change. but based on his focus grouping and polling, there was still a narrow window of opportunity left to inse
Al Jazeera America
Aug 25, 2013 2:00am EDT
news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> 50 years after martin luther king junior delivered his monumental i have a dream speech, tens of thousands are in washington to commemorate that dream. some worry that the advances are in dangery of being rolled back. >> reporter: the crowds that massed in front of the lincoln mey morial didn't match the 200,000 or more who watched martin luther king at the same spot half a century ago. but their determination to see america redeem his vision was strong, as children they were at the 25th anniversary of the march and brought their own kids to the 50 year commemoration. >> there are a lot of people who still care about equity and justice in the united states and recognize we haven't made it, but we are also fighting for the same cause. >> reporter: the speakers underlined the obstacles that still hindered black americas. >> america needs a new plan for our cities to provide job, infra
Al Jazeera America
Aug 30, 2013 4:00pm EDT
there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> you know, they may be tiny, but they have a huge impact on the food we eat, and the world we live in. honeybees are a critical link in the food chain, but the bee population is shrinking at an alarming rate. and scientists have been scrambling to keep the numbers up. allen schauffler has more from washington state. >> yes, you can. >> one drone produces one microlevel of semen. >> with the right tools and expertise, which this student has. >> the tip is about 60-microns in diameter. >> you can collect semen from individual male bees. >> it takes about 100 mature male drones to fill this tube. >> and then freeze it with liquid nitrogen and keep it chilling in the corner of the lab. >> we are establishing a genetic repository for honeybee germ plasm. >> it is a sperm bank for bees, the first of its kind on this scale anywhere. honeybees aren't native to north america. they were
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 12:00am EDT
channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. park. yarlz continues after this. al jazeera will continue aftert. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. ♪ >>> it is an emotional week here in washington as the city marks the 50th anniversary of dr. martin luther king jr's i have a dream speech. which was delivered on the steps of the lincoln memorial. but there was another message from dr. king that historians agree set in motion a revolutionary movement, one which lead to the march on washington
Al Jazeera America
Aug 29, 2013 1:00am EDT
there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. inside of it. >> as the cries in syria plays out, rogue hackers have been busy with cyber attacks on the u.s. if you tried to go to "the new york times" website tuesday to get the latest on syria, you would have been directed to the syrian electric army instead manufacture it has been restored, but twitter accounts and even president obama's social media has been sit since the war in syria began. while it has been a nuisance, the threat of a major cyber attack on critical american infrastructure is a growing concern and clearly on the mind of janet napolitano. >> our country will for example at some point face a major sign are event that will have a serious event on our lives, the economy and the every day funking of our society. more must be done quickly. >> joining me now to talk about the implication of cyber attacks and the threats we might face is a former hacker. he is
Al Jazeera America
Aug 25, 2013 4:00am EDT
ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas, and i'm an associate producer for america tonight. i grew up in a very large, loud indian family. they very much taught me how to have a voice, and from a very young age i loved writing, and i love being able to tell other people stories. the way to do good journalism is to really do your research, to know your story, to get the facts right, and to get to know the people involved in your story. america tonight and al jazeera america, it's a perfect place for that to happen. >> welcome back, louisiana has the highest incarceration in the world because of new orleans, the justice department and the sheriff are all battling over jail reforms. it is graphic and may be disturbing. >> in the shadow of downtown new orleans. >> the wall and the fence is not to keep people in, but to keep people like y'all out. >> it's called opp by the locals. >> why do they want to keep us out? >> because nobody wants
Al Jazeera America
Aug 23, 2013 4:00pm EDT
americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> celebrations for the 50th anniversary will kick off tomorrow. two washington residents who were there five decades ago share their memories. [♪ singing ] >> i was 28 when i takenne attee march, and i attended with my father. >> 200 sang on the 28th of august. >> i'm constance, i was 13 years old, and i attended with my mother, who was in her 60s. we didn't know what participant was going to say, so if you could move that day, you were going to be at that march. >> there was a sense of feeling that this was a risky undertaking, but that sense was over taken by the view you got to do this. if i'm not going to stand up for me, who else will. >> when i think about it, you talk about policemen and soldiers, you could not move without being in contact with some authority. most surprise to go me was the fact that there were so many people who were non-africa. i had no idea that many americans felt stronger about th
Al Jazeera America
Aug 22, 2013 8:00pm EDT
know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> and welcome back, everyone, michael eaves is here with sports, and a very tough case for a former nflplayer. >> yeah. a grand jury in massachusetts has indicted the new england player, the indictment charges him with killing a 27-year-old. hernandez pleaded not guilty to both the murder and gun charges in june, and is currently being held without bail. police have yet to find the murder weapon. attorneys for hernandez says they are confident they can clear their client's name. >>> thursday a team from california and japan -- excuse me that was on wednesday -- earned spots in the little league world series for ids from california have definitely been the rock stars of the tournament. they had to rally back last night, they tied it up at 3-3, and then in extra innings grant does it again. this kid is some kind of special. he is 6'4". he has two hits on the tournament. the other hit, a grand slam, so he is making it count. he has 23 str
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